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Study reveals 'unhappiest' cities in the U.S.

New research identifies the unhappiest cities in the U.S., but finds that some young people are still willing to relocate to them for a good job opportunity or lower housing prices. The analysis suggests people may be deciding to trade happiness for other gains.

sciencedaily.com

21 hrs ago

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Vitamin D deficiency raises risk of schizophrenia diagnosis

Vitamin D-deficient individuals are twice as likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia as people who have sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and is needed for bone and muscle health. The skin naturally produces this vitamin after exposure to sunlight. People also obtain smaller amounts of the vitamin through foods, such as milk fortified with vitamin D. More than 1 billion people worldwide are estimated to have deficient levels of...

sciencedaily.com

16 hrs ago

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Extra exercise helps depressed smokers kick the habit faster

People diagnosed with depression need to step out for a cigarette twice as often as smokers who are not dealing with a mood disorder. And those who have the hardest time shaking off the habit may have more mental health issues than they are actually aware of, research suggests. While nearly one in five North American adults are regular smokers, a figure that continues to steadily decline, about 40 per cent of depressed people are in need of a regular drag.

sciencedaily.com

17 hrs ago

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Schizophrenia's genetic 'skyline' rising as genetic code linked to illness grows

The largest genomic dragnet of any psychiatric disorder to date has unmasked 108 chromosomal sites harboring inherited variations in the genetic code linked to schizophrenia, 83 of which had not been previously reported. By contrast, the 'skyline' of such suspect variants associated with the disorder contained only 5 significant peaks in 2011. Researchers combined data from all available schizophrenia genetic samples to boost statistical power high enough to detect subtle effects on risk.

sciencedaily.com

22 hrs ago

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How children categorize living things

"Name everything you can think of that is alive." How would a child respond to this question? Would his or her list be full of relatives, animals from movies and books, or perhaps neighborhood pets? Would the poppies blooming on the front steps make the list or the oak tree towering over the backyard? The children's responses in a recent study revealed clear convergences among distinct communities but also illuminated differences among them.

sciencedaily.com

18 hrs ago

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You should talk to strangers: Doing so increases positive experience, study shows

An interesting social paradox plays out every morning around the world as millions of people board commuter trains and buses: Human beings are one of the most social species on the planet, yet when in close proximity with one another -- sitting inches away on a train -- we routinely ignore each other. Why can such social agents be so antisocial? Participants in recent experiments not only underestimated others’ interest in connecting, but also reported positive experiences by both being spoken...

sciencedaily.com

17 hrs ago

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Children's impulsive behaviour is related to brain connectivity

The changes in the brain that are associated with impulsiveness -- a personality trait that causes difficulties in inhibiting a response in the face of a stimulus and leads to unplanned actions without considering the negative consequences -- has been the focus of recent study. These patterns can serve as an indicator for predicting the risk of behavioral problems. A new study analyzes whether the connectivity of an infant's brain is related to children's impulsiveness.

sciencedaily.com

22 hrs ago

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Understanding how neuro cells turn cancerous

New research, for the first time, brings scientists nearer to understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system become cancerous. The team studied a tumor suppressor called Merlin. Their results have identified a new mechanism whereby Merlin suppresses tumors, and that the mechanism operates within the nucleus. The research team has discovered that unsuppressed tumor cells increase via a core signalling system, the hippo pathway, and they have identified the route and method by which...

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18 hrs ago

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Can strong parental bond protect infants down to their DNA?

Scientists are launching a groundbreaking study looking at critical periods early in a child’s life when exposure to stressors matters most. The goal is to track telomeres – a cellular marker for aging and stress – to discover the biological mechanism for how early trauma gets under the skin, potentially stealing time from a child’s biological clock. Can parents create a biological buffer that shields children decades later from disease and toxic stress?

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19 hrs ago

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Mothers of Children with Autism Benefit From Peer-Led Intervention

Peer-led interventions that target parental well-being can significantly reduce stress, depression and anxiety in mothers of children with disabilities, according to new findings. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers examined two treatment programs in a large number of primary caregivers of a child with a disability. Participants in both groups experienced improvements in mental health, sleep and overall life satisfaction and showed less dysfunctional parent-child interactions.

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16 hrs ago

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Neuroprotective role of immune cell discovered

A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to research. "Our findings suggest the innate immune system helps protect the brain after injury or during chronic disease, and this role should be further studied," the lead researcher said.

sciencedaily.com

19 hrs ago

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Good news for aging population: Incidence of stroke in elderly has dropped by 40% over last 20 years

A new analysis of data from 1988-2008 has revealed a 40% decrease in the incidence of stroke in Medicare patients 65 years of age and older. This decline is greater than anticipated considering this population’s risk factors for stroke, and applies to both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Investigators also found death resulting from stroke declined during the same period.

sciencedaily.com

16 hrs ago

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Are state Medicaid policies sentencing people with mental illnesses to prison?

A link between Medicaid policies on antipsychotic drugs and incarceration rates for schizophrenic individuals has been uncovered by a new study. Researchers found that states requiring prior authorization for atypical antipsychotics had less serious mental illness overall but higher shares of inmates with psychotic symptoms than the national average. The study concluded that prior authorization of atypical antipsychotics was associated with a 22 percent increase in the likelihood of...

sciencedaily.com

16 hrs ago

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Overdoing it: Multiple perspectives confuse consumers

When it comes to television advertising, simple may be best, says one expert, whose study reports that multiple angles and perspectives in commercials may actually prevent consumers from forming positive associations about the products. She found this to be particularly true for consumers who imagine using the products themselves in the course of evaluating them.

sciencedaily.com

20 hrs ago

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Why consumers choose high-effort products

Stuck in traffic? On hold for what seems like an eternity? Consumers often face situations that undermine their feelings of control. According to a new study, when a person's sense of control is threatened, they are more likely to seek out products that require hard work.

sciencedaily.com

19 hrs ago

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High school lacrosse players at risk for concussions, other injuries, study finds

High school players experienced 1,406 injuries over the four academic years from 2008 through 2012, a new study reports. The overall injury rate was 20 per 10,000 lacrosse competitions and practices. More than 22 percent of those injuries were concussions, making that the second most common injury diagnosis behind sprains and strains (38 percent).

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20 hrs ago

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